Toronto looks to superheroes to promote flu vaccinations

Toronto will enlist the help of Marvel, DC, World Wrestling Entertainment and other famous characters this fall to promote flu vaccines for children. In a statement from Public Health Ontario, a variety of superheroes,…

Toronto looks to superheroes to promote flu vaccinations

Toronto will enlist the help of Marvel, DC, World Wrestling Entertainment and other famous characters this fall to promote flu vaccines for children.

In a statement from Public Health Ontario, a variety of superheroes, including Spider-Man, Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, She-Ra, Mattel’s Power Rangers and many more will be asking parents and caregivers to get their kids vaccinated against the flu.

According to the statement, so-called superheroes will make appearances at community events and meet with children and their families in different parts of the Greater Toronto Area over the next month to promote children’s flu vaccinations. The campaign launches September 3 and runs through the end of October.

There are various schedules of vaccines that include influenza A and B vaccines; seasonal influenza vaccine; shingles vaccine; immunizations for people over the age of 6 months old to protect against meningitis and neonatal tetanus; and supplemental immunity to rotavirus, a potentially life-threatening infection in young children.

Canada’s vaccination rates for children were among the lowest in the developed world in 2017, at 67.3%, according to the World Health Organization. The Canadian government is making efforts to increase them, and studies suggest that public awareness is one of the most effective ways to do so.

If you live in Toronto, you are most likely familiar with FC Barcelona’s Lionel Messi, but the multi-millionaire soccer star and his teammates will join others in promoting vaccines for children. Messi has spoken out about the importance of flu vaccines in the past, saying that “every child should be protected.”

Robeson College in Toronto will also be collecting donations to promote flu vaccinations for children with a special look from characters at students’ backpacks.

For the first time, researchers have a database in which they can track how much people donated to charity over the course of an entire year. The research focused on how Canadians gave from December 2013 to November 2014, and how much of that donated money went to various causes.

In Toronto, 75% of the donated money went to causes, compared with the Canadian average of 62.5%.

Still, a large number of people in Toronto contributed to causes and still did not get vaccinated against the flu. Health authorities in Toronto said they expect that they will start seeing cases of influenza in mid-October, and that they are not sure how many people will come down with the flu.

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