Sudanese security forces open fire on protesters

Image copyright AFP Image caption Ahmed Ansi was detained on Sunday At least six people have been killed and scores injured as security forces open fire on protesters during demonstrations in Sudan, the Red…

Sudanese security forces open fire on protesters

Image copyright AFP Image caption Ahmed Ansi was detained on Sunday

At least six people have been killed and scores injured as security forces open fire on protesters during demonstrations in Sudan, the Red Sea state.

At least 200 people have been arrested, the official SUNA news agency said.

They were protesting against rising inflation and a recent increase in fuel prices.

Sudan has been engulfed by protests against high fuel and food prices this month.

Clashes between security forces and protesters continued on Monday, with hundreds taking to the streets of the capital, Khartoum, after a protest.

At least two people were killed in the protests on Sunday, according to MedicalEye.net.

Two teenagers and a man have died of their injuries since the unrest began on 27 July, the site said.

According to the Sudanese Observatory for Human Rights, three members of the security forces have been killed in protests.

The Sudanese government announced that President Omar al-Bashir had authorised the military to shoot on site, even though protesters were demanding he step down.

Earlier, Sudan’s state security minister said security forces had used lethal force against armed protesters, however the New York-based rights group Human Rights Watch on Sunday accused police of excessive force and using “blunt weapons indiscriminately”.

“Mortars, armoured personnel carriers, attack helicopters, tear gas, rubber bullets, and live ammunition have been fired at peaceful protesters who have not posed any threat to life,” it said.

Sudan was gripped by civil wars for more than a decade until 2005. President Bashir has since been accused of organising the country’s first genocide, since the civil war against southern Sudanese rebels, according to UN investigators.

The protests started last week after the Sudanese pound fell to around one-third of the official rate, making products such as fuel and sugar more expensive.

President Bashir has not commented on the demonstrations.

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