Sudan PM says army, spies and police has been officially abolished

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Sudan’s government says it is taking action to fight corruption Sudan has ended a 21-year-old military junta with the rule of President Omar al-Bashir in place for an…

Sudan PM says army, spies and police has been officially abolished

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Sudan’s government says it is taking action to fight corruption

Sudan has ended a 21-year-old military junta with the rule of President Omar al-Bashir in place for an indefinite period.

The national congress (NC) had only recently given commanders of all the armies, militias and police forces five days to report to the new interior minister.

The military has also been handed over to the National Intelligence and Security Service (NISS).

Mr Bashir remains president, but now it is his “State Council” which is in charge.

The military takes over

The military has been put under the command of President Bashir’s two sons.

The national security officials have a total of 17 cabinet ministers in place, compared to the previous 17 ministers and seven deputy ministers in charge.

A new government has been appointed, headed by Prime Minister Omar Hamza.

Profile: Omar al-Bashir

What has the outgoing government said?

Mr Bashir said the national congress had started a campaign against corruption, with “many arrests”, but didn’t elaborate.

He said “the corrupt and the people in high positions” were “backing the coup against justice”.

Mr Hamza said his government would “fight all forms of corruption” in the army, the NISS and “every other area”.

Opposition groups have rejected the new regime.

Agnes Dalia, of the Sudanese Movement for Change, told BBC Arabic: “The new authority is the same as the old one, even that of Omar al-Bashir.

“It’s the same people, it’s the same activities. A coup against justice is not accepted by the people of Sudan, but they are not allowed to express their opinion.”

Many opposition politicians have been jailed, despite saying in a letter signed by 42 of them, that they support the current constitutional process of transferring power, including a date for elections.

Image copyright REUTERS Image caption Omar al-Bashir (L) pictured in 2016, and Sobhi Saleh Bekali (R) in 2007

But none of the signatories to the letter have yet been arrested.

A BBC reporter in Sudan says that the military has been given its full powers, and has controlled the world’s youngest nation since Mr Bashir took power in a 1989 coup.

New government appointees include a military general, a former minister and two army officers, each appointed as defence minister.

What happens next?

Mr Bashir’s National Congress Party has won every election since he seized power, but is facing an opposition movement growing in strength.

In April, the country’s main opposition parties renewed efforts to oust him.

They accuse him of abusing his power and imposing growing government control.

Mr Bashir has been the subject of an ICC arrest warrant since 2009 over alleged war crimes committed in the Darfur region during a years-long insurgency.

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