Remains of cave fire that killed 33 workers in selfie perspective

The cave fire at whose massive lava dome collapsed, killing 33 workers, provides a glimpse into the past as man attempts to make sense of its present. The reason why the bulk of the…

Remains of cave fire that killed 33 workers in selfie perspective

The cave fire at whose massive lava dome collapsed, killing 33 workers, provides a glimpse into the past as man attempts to make sense of its present.

The reason why the bulk of the remains are in such a precarious condition came to light on Tuesday when the remains were examined in Mammoth Cave National Park in Kentucky.

“The ancient conifer fire, which erupted 14,000 years ago, has healed itself after millions of years,” said University of Tennessee historian Phillip M. Murray, who co-authored the study. “We believe that it was undisturbed by the subsequent climate change.”

On November 15, the park gained international attention with the collapse of the dome, which engulfed 33 workers who had to be killed, 47 hospitalized and 11 left unaccounted for after a 6,800-foot drop in the ceiling.

Authorities have revealed that their response will cost $1.8 million to clean, remove, reassemble and relight the cave as thousands of visitors to see the ground collapse around them. A team of experts visited the site Wednesday, where they discovered a hole “too large to explain by simple gravity” in which bones were being discovered. On Friday, a member of the team will attempt to retrieve a jawbone but, in the meantime, researchers are coming up with other ways to revive the cave.

“It can be consumed by something other than a fire,” said Murray. “We don’t know exactly how.”

Read the full story at The Independent.

Related

Maine town can’t finish burial of woman’s remains after bizarre cave death

Archaeologists hunting for remains of 7,000-year-old slaughtered baby solve mystery

Leave a Comment