Help isn’t always on hand: How to safely move workers in an office

Long lines or bumps on the pavement can take a toll on an office’s performance, due to shaking and minimal support from chairs. This head-bumping obstacle can require physical rest and attentive attention from…

Help isn’t always on hand: How to safely move workers in an office

Long lines or bumps on the pavement can take a toll on an office’s performance, due to shaking and minimal support from chairs. This head-bumping obstacle can require physical rest and attentive attention from employees.

Office performance suffers at every position, but especially in areas where there’s no easy way to move, such as construction and reception desk work. Front desk workers are particularly vulnerable due to the lack of proper tools and supplies. And those who don’t fear losing their jobs must sometimes respond with a less-than-professional demeanor to concerns from customers.

Other troublesome positions: distribution and fulfillment, quality control, customer service, healthcare and social assistance, banking and finance. These jobs will always be at a physical disadvantage to other workplaces.

An annual poll from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce reveals that 28 percent of employers said those positions had declined or completely dissolved in the past five years.

On average, companies said seven percent of their staff work in these roles, per the Chamber poll.

Read the full story at Urban Daddy.

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