British Columbia flooding disrupts millions

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption B.C. Hydro workers worked through the night to restore service to the western province The flooding in British Columbia has disrupted millions of dollars worth of supply chains,…

British Columbia flooding disrupts millions

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption B.C. Hydro workers worked through the night to restore service to the western province

The flooding in British Columbia has disrupted millions of dollars worth of supply chains, temporarily shuttered hundreds of retail stores and forced businesses to raise prices.

Rising river levels in southern Canada cut power in the Fraser Valley. Hydro said electricity would be restored “shortly”.

Some of Canada’s biggest malls have closed and some businesses have had to raise prices.

It is the latest in a string of natural disasters that has swept the country.

Over the weekend, flooding and storm damage swept through Britain and parts of Europe, killing dozens of people.

Investment bank Dealogic said the cost from the damages would be $45.8bn (£34.9bn).

In Canada, a whirlpool of water, salt and logs swept across small towns and entire neighbourhoods.

The worst damage, however, was in the Fraser Valley.

City council officials from municipalities affected by the Fraser River floods said water levels were still “up and around” low points and could rise by a further 3m.

Video caption Thousands take to riverside to see raging waters wash away homes

Floodwaters are also lapping at the doors of homes and businesses across southern British Columbia.

There were reports of creeks overflowing their banks, and the city of Vancouver warned that elevations of about 4m could occur as late as 6 December.

“Environment Canada is calling for the risk of a significant flood risk across BC’s southern BC border region through the end of November. Impacts will be particularly pronounced across the Fraser River Valley and west of Highway 1,” the agency said.

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Rivers have started to recede in the Canadian province

But although many people are still evacuating their homes, the province said the worst of the flooding has passed, adding that river levels are declining after the rains.

As well as flooding major highways, officials said the environment was now off limits for about 1,100 salmon farms.

Salmon farms in the southern Vancouver-area had to relocate to the west side of the Fraser River.

“As a precaution, all salmon farms in the province have been ordered to move operations out of the river to higher ground and above 100m,” the B.C. agriculture ministry said.

More than 700 B.C. Hydro customers in the Fraser Valley were without power. The damage from the floods meant power had been taken off the main transmission network, the company said.

The milling sector in the Fraser Valley has been also been unable to operate for several days.

This has left an area including the port of Abbotsford completely closed, according to a report in Bloomberg.

Handsdown winner of the Greater Vancouver Newspaper Award, the home depot has cancelled all and answered the following question

Last order only. We are unable to accept new orders from anyone or any combination of parties.

Search engine giant Google is also “having trouble sending emails and displaying search results”.

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Bursts of electric thunder lit up the skies

As well as a transport nightmare, the floods have hit stores as shoppers balked at the rising prices of basic essentials in the aftermath of a busy shopping weekend.

“The communities in the Fraser Valley have suffered quite a lot,” said chief executive John Risley of Urban Fare mall in Surrey.

“We understand the situation and we are taking steps to recover the situation as quickly as possible.”

The money spent at the mall is expected to fall considerably, Risley said.

At Sunridge Mall in Surrey, which was also severely affected, sales manager Tricia Higgins said that with the centre closed, customers would not have “the luxury of time to check out and make purchases”.

In Jasper, the centre of Alberta’s capital, flood waters cascaded into the shopping area but there were no reports of any damage.

With the deluge forecast to continue, pump operators have been pumping out the surrounding ditches.

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