12 most visited museums in America

Written by By Sara Viandana, CNN “I probably spend more time looking at these objects than reading the newspaper,” quips Harold Wilson, a member of the Nasher Sculpture Center’s Curatorial Advisory Committee. “People come…

12 most visited museums in America

Written by By Sara Viandana, CNN

“I probably spend more time looking at these objects than reading the newspaper,” quips Harold Wilson, a member of the Nasher Sculpture Center’s Curatorial Advisory Committee.

“People come from all over the world,” he continues, “and see that their objects are in our collections. Their spirits are honored.”

The objects themselves are treasures in their own right, and include a pair of the most famous headless aviator instruments, owned by Noah Webster and done up by a New York artist.

You might expect the World’s Tallest Tower, the 3,776-foot One World Trade Center, to attract hordes of visitors. According to the National Museum Association, last year just over 300,000 people visited the 1.4-million-square-foot structure, considered the most popular travel destination in the world. The Nasher Center has the likes of Poussin’s “The Thirteen Apostles” by Jan van Eyck and Pablo Picasso’s “To the Cyclist” to thank for drawing in far more.

Meanwhile, a Brooklyn architect, Park Avenue’s Woolworth Building and a multimillion-dollar sculpture from Ireland have won over more than 5.7 million visitors in recent years.

Another fascinating discovery — and perhaps the most impressive undertaking on the Nasher’s tour this year — was it discovering the true story behind one of the biggest offerings on its permanent collection.

The drawing is actually from 19th-century China. (The building itself was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1931.) The general idea of turning the woodwork of the century-old Nasher into a work of art by Japanese artist Kenzo Tange, who died in 1944, “came about because I was thinking about people who are left out of art museums,” said museum director Robert Price.

Looking for Lost Graffiti? Visit The Museum of the Manhattan D.A.

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